Music from Chad – Mounira Mitchala

Mounira Mitchala is singer and song-writer from Chad. Mounira Mitchala ’s watchwords were now determination and pleasure. In spring 2011, she recorded her second album in Paris: Chili Houritki (Take Your Independence).

Backed by the musicians who usually appear with her on stage and bassist Guy N’Sangué, the young woman’s powerful voice and rough, sensual timbre weave their spell around songs based on everyday life in Chad. In that part of the Sahel, which straddles sub-Saharan Africa and the Arab world, issues of drought, desertification, access to water and malnutrition are compounded by poor governance and endemic corruption. Although she is not a protest singer as such, Mounira observes and condemns. The injustices women are subjected to are among her main concerns. Outraged and determined to fight on, she brings the same talent and conviction to her struggle for dignity as her Malian sister Oumou Sangaré.

Although based on the beats and colours of traditional genres, her melodies are firmly contemporary. In ballads brimming with emotion, Mounira’s voice grows gentler and smoother. Camel Zekri’s arrangements, which focus on acoustic sounds, perfectly showcase this remarkable timbre, this desert folk blues so beautifully expressed by Mounira Mitchala. Here is the song “Choukrane”

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Music from Algérie – Hasna El Bacharia

Hasna El Bécharia is extraordinary. She is still the only woman in the Maghreb to play gnawi music, a ceremonial beat that has remained an exclusively male preserve since the animist beliefs of the Bilad es-Sudan, (in Arabic, the Land of the Blacks – today’s Guinea, Senegal, Mali, Niger and Chad) encountered the monotheist faith of Islam from across the desert. Her choice has exposed her to a great deal of rejection and sarcasm, but Hasna’s mind and soul are irrevocably bound up with the mystic trance music learnt from her father, a pious man who was himself a maâllem or master of gnawi (the plural of gnawa) syncretism, a black Sufism forged by the descendants of sub-Saharan slaves in White Africa, also called diwan in East Algeria and stambali in Tunisia. Here is her song “Hakmet Lakdar”

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Music from Chad – Mawndoé

Mawndoé is a great musician from Chad, who released his first solo album in 2012. The years before he started his solo career, he played together with Smarty in the Burkinabé duo Yeleen. For me, Mawndoé is one of the greatest african musicians with his great voice and the nice guitar sounds. Listen to his great song “On survivra”:

Music from Mali – Salif Keita

Salif Keita is one of the most poplar African pop-music artists. Because of having albinism, he was offended by his family when he was young. Albinos need respect too, Salif Keita is a good example for typical albino problems: he had to leave his home early to live in Bamako and reached with detours Paris, to get more popular. We should pay respect to this man, and we should’t despise albinos! His song “Tomorrow” is one of his best:

Music from Chad – Mawndoé

Updated song:

Mawndoé from the groupe Yeleen has released his first solo album “Daari”! Here’s the great song “Que des Hommes“(in english: Just some men), the second one from the album in a short time, but it’s so nice!!!!
Little refrain lyrics: Nous sommes que des hommes, un peu fou, pas parfait, aussi faux, aussi vrai, nous sommes que des hommes….
In english: We are just some men, a bit crazy, not perfect, also false, also right, we are just some men…..

Please like and share this wonderful one!!!

Listen to Alfarhan here